Why Did Labour Vote Against The Withdrawal Agreement

Six Labour MPs on Friday braved lashes away from the party to vote in favour of Boris Johnson`s EU withdrawal deal, and more than 30 remained out of the way. The proposed programme was approved by 353 votes to 243. On 22 October 2019, the House of Commons agreed, by 329 votes to 299, to give a second reading to the revised withdrawal agreement (negotiated by Boris Johnson earlier this month), but when the accelerated timetable it had proposed did not receive the necessary parliamentary support, Johnson announced that the law would be overturned. [38] [12] MPs also voted by 353 votes to 243 in favour of the government`s proposed timetable for the bill. However, estimates of the leave vote in each constituency indicate that 148 of these 232 Labour seats won a majority in favour of Leave. The most important elements of the draft agreement are:[21] Among those who did not vote in either of the two lobbies were Ian Lavery, Andrew Gwynne, John Healey and Jon Trickett. The government rejected the Lords` proposal to give the House of Commons the power to decide the next steps for the government if the withdrawal agreement is rejected by Parliament. [35] On 12 February 2019, Theresa May made a statement to the House of Commons on the government`s progress in securing a withdrawal agreement. [87] On 14 February, a vote on a amendable motion was held as follows: “Let this House welcome the Prime Minister`s statement of 12 February 2019; reaffirms its support for the approach to leaving the EU expressed by this House on 29 January 2019 and notes that discussions between the UK and the EU on the “backstop” are under way. The Northern Ireland Protocol, known as the Irish Backstop, was an annex to the November 2018 draft agreement outlining provisions to avoid a hard border in Ireland after the UK`s withdrawal from the European Union. The protocol provided for a provision of the safety net to deal with the circumstances in which satisfactory alternative arrangements were to come into force at the end of the transition period.

This project has been replaced by a new protocol that will be described as follows. One Labour MP (Paul Flynn, absent due to prolonged illness), abstained,[78] the seven Sinn-Féin MPs who have an abstention policy, and eight others: spokesman John Bercow, Deputy Spokesperson Eleanor Laing (Conservative), Lindsay Hoyle (labour) and Rosie Winterton (work); Moreover, the voices of the narrators are not taken into account (for the Ayes, Wendy Morton and Iain Stewart, both Conservatives, and for the Noes, Vicky Foxcroft and Nick Smith, both Labor). [79] [80] On 18 April 2017, Theresa May announced the establishment of an early general election on 8 June 2017[11] aimed at strengthening her hand in the Brexit negotiations. [12] This led to a lagging Parliament, where the number of Conservatives rose from 330 to 317, although the party won its highest number of votes since 1983, which led it to negotiate a confidence and supply contract with the Democratic Unionist Party (DUP) to support a minority government.